This picture may not seem jiu-jitsu related but says a lot about this wonderful morning and beautiful life. 
Earlier today, for the 1st time EVER on a school day, my daughter, Annika, woke up by herself 30 minutes earlier than wake-up time. It was like a miraculous break-through for her waking up process. A couple of months ago when school started, she literally had to be dragged out of bed just to get up. I took the initiative of waking her up every morning for the past 2 weeks. It wasn’t easy for me too since our training ends around 10:30pm plus hanging out with the bjj fam after. It’s a commitment I made to me and my daughter. Like I always say, “we ALWAYS keep promises”. This builds trust and we all know how trust changes everything. And it did. We built good habits of her consistently (sleeping and) waking up on time to the point that she independently got up by herself on a school day. One of the best feelings in the world is the fulfillment of achieving a goal paved by little commitments that become habitual. 
She sweetly requested to be brought to school using the scooter. How could anyone say no? I happily obliged and we rode with her arms around me. She didn’t even mind wearing a helmet and messing up her hair. But of course, when she got off the scooter and took of her helmet, I brought a comb, brushed her hair and put on her headband. This might be small but I will cherish this as a father, for the rest of my life.
I’m enjoying every bit of my daughter’s childhood. For the 1st time in a long time, I had to rest a whole week without training because of my infected wound, which caused my lower leg to swell in pain. I took this as an opportunity to really catch up with my children. Little mishaps are life’s way of telling us to “Slow down, son”. Smell the flowers and look at the beauty all around you. It’s enjoying the journey towards a destination. The little bumps and setbacks (little or large) help us realize to look around us and appreciate what we have.
Cherish every little moment of life, whether it be a struggle. Don’t be in a rush. Same thing in the little world of jiu-jitsu, when we become black belts with time and work put in, we don’t want to say that we wish you took longer on lower belts to work on specific skills. We enjoy and embrace every step of the way.

This picture may not seem jiu-jitsu related but says a lot about this wonderful morning and beautiful life.

Earlier today, for the 1st time EVER on a school day, my daughter, Annika, woke up by herself 30 minutes earlier than wake-up time. It was like a miraculous break-through for her waking up process. A couple of months ago when school started, she literally had to be dragged out of bed just to get up. I took the initiative of waking her up every morning for the past 2 weeks. It wasn’t easy for me too since our training ends around 10:30pm plus hanging out with the bjj fam after. It’s a commitment I made to me and my daughter. Like I always say, “we ALWAYS keep promises”. This builds trust and we all know how trust changes everything. And it did. We built good habits of her consistently (sleeping and) waking up on time to the point that she independently got up by herself on a school day. One of the best feelings in the world is the fulfillment of achieving a goal paved by little commitments that become habitual. 

She sweetly requested to be brought to school using the scooter. How could anyone say no? I happily obliged and we rode with her arms around me. She didn’t even mind wearing a helmet and messing up her hair. But of course, when she got off the scooter and took of her helmet, I brought a comb, brushed her hair and put on her headband. This might be small but I will cherish this as a father, for the rest of my life.

I’m enjoying every bit of my daughter’s childhood. For the 1st time in a long time, I had to rest a whole week without training because of my infected wound, which caused my lower leg to swell in pain. I took this as an opportunity to really catch up with my children. Little mishaps are life’s way of telling us to “Slow down, son”. Smell the flowers and look at the beauty all around you. It’s enjoying the journey towards a destination. The little bumps and setbacks (little or large) help us realize to look around us and appreciate what we have.

Cherish every little moment of life, whether it be a struggle. Don’t be in a rush. Same thing in the little world of jiu-jitsu, when we become black belts with time and work put in, we don’t want to say that we wish you took longer on lower belts to work on specific skills. We enjoy and embrace every step of the way.

#noego #noegobjj #grapplersreview #jiujitsu #qotd

#noego #noegobjj #grapplersreview #jiujitsu #qotd

Gui Mendes Seminar (Philippines)

For the past weeks, I’ve been given the beautiful opportunity by our professor Alvin Aguilar to be set aside from “regular” class to enhance my guard game by doing micro transition drilling.
My partner and I would do a specific move for 5 minutes each with emphasis on executing each movement as slow as possible. By doing things slowly and step-by-step, we discover little details, that make a certain move work to perfection (well, almost).
This was my first time to ever do micro transition drilling and I appreciate the time put into it. It feels like I was just playing tag or hide & seek as a kid. Fully engrossed and concentrated into just “playing”. Micro transition drilling definitely sharpened my guard game plus I was able to discover those little details that make “it” work. In my few 3+ years of training, I think micro transition drilling has helped me push the level of my game up like never before in such a short span of time. This has translated to a tighter and “crisper” game that helped me get better plus a greater appreciation in the art of jiu-jitsu.
For this, I am thankful for our Professor Alvin Aguilar for looking at our individual skills and honing them further to be better.
We’ve been also doing trains lately in preparation for the upcoming Nationals competition. I was not just physically on the mats but I put 100% of my mind and heart to the competition training. This has really pushed me to become stronger in my jiu-jitsu game and also in mind & heart that eventually makes us better persons. 

For the past weeks, I’ve been given the beautiful opportunity by our professor Alvin Aguilar to be set aside from “regular” class to enhance my guard game by doing micro transition drilling.

My partner and I would do a specific move for 5 minutes each with emphasis on executing each movement as slow as possible. By doing things slowly and step-by-step, we discover little details, that make a certain move work to perfection (well, almost).

This was my first time to ever do micro transition drilling and I appreciate the time put into it. It feels like I was just playing tag or hide & seek as a kid. Fully engrossed and concentrated into just “playing”. Micro transition drilling definitely sharpened my guard game plus I was able to discover those little details that make “it” work. In my few 3+ years of training, I think micro transition drilling has helped me push the level of my game up like never before in such a short span of time. This has translated to a tighter and “crisper” game that helped me get better plus a greater appreciation in the art of jiu-jitsu.

For this, I am thankful for our Professor Alvin Aguilar for looking at our individual skills and honing them further to be better.

We’ve been also doing trains lately in preparation for the upcoming Nationals competition. I was not just physically on the mats but I put 100% of my mind and heart to the competition training. This has really pushed me to become stronger in my jiu-jitsu game and also in mind & heart that eventually makes us better persons. 

I affiliated and co-related noego to jiujitsu because there is no stage better than jiujitsu to showcase this. There are no lies in jiujitsu. There is truth on the mats and you cannot hide nor lie. You can have all the swag in this world but when you step on the mats it’s your quiet self-confidence and your game emanating based on the work you put in. You can be the athletic phenom or a lanky person, or maybe even the richest or the poorest person in the world but when you step on the mats, none of that matters. Your true character will show. There is no quick fix in learning jiujitsu. It takes time and is never in a rush. You reap what you sow. It is very simple on the mats. You get what you put in. You can achieve a lot if you are humble and have noego. Then again, this is not just in jiujitsu but also in life. 
Noegobjj is more than just about me. It is an ideal that I did not myself invent but a universal principle of humility and humbleness. Principles are universal, which applies to everyone, and will stand the test of time. It’s like gravity. It keeps us grounded. It will always be there.
When we, as men, devote ourselves to an idea, it becomes a movement that can not be stopped. We become bigger than just ourselves. We become infinite in a sense. We become a legacy. That is what noego is. 
“As a man, I’m flesh and blood, I can be ignored, I can be destroyed; but as a symbol… as a symbol I can be incorruptible, I can be everlasting.” -Batman Begins

I affiliated and co-related noego to jiujitsu because there is no stage better than jiujitsu to showcase this. There are no lies in jiujitsu. There is truth on the mats and you cannot hide nor lie. You can have all the swag in this world but when you step on the mats it’s your quiet self-confidence and your game emanating based on the work you put in. You can be the athletic phenom or a lanky person, or maybe even the richest or the poorest person in the world but when you step on the mats, none of that matters. Your true character will show. There is no quick fix in learning jiujitsu. It takes time and is never in a rush. You reap what you sow. It is very simple on the mats. You get what you put in. You can achieve a lot if you are humble and have noego. Then again, this is not just in jiujitsu but also in life. 

Noegobjj is more than just about me. It is an ideal that I did not myself invent but a universal principle of humility and humbleness. Principles are universal, which applies to everyone, and will stand the test of time. It’s like gravity. It keeps us grounded. It will always be there.

When we, as men, devote ourselves to an idea, it becomes a movement that can not be stopped. We become bigger than just ourselves. We become infinite in a sense. We become a legacy. That is what noego is. 

“As a man, I’m flesh and blood, I can be ignored, I can be destroyed; but as a symbol… as a symbol I can be incorruptible, I can be everlasting.” -Batman Begins

It’s always a beauty when positive ideas are supported and promoted.
Do Or Die brand takes part of the noego idea by coming up with their own take with “#killegos” in their latest release of kimono. I don’t like the word “kill” on the concept but then again the branding is Do Or “Die”. Well, the idea itself is awesome. 

It’s always a beauty when positive ideas are supported and promoted.

Do Or Die brand takes part of the noego idea by coming up with their own take with “#killegos” in their latest release of kimono. I don’t like the word “kill” on the concept but then again the branding is Do Or “Die”. Well, the idea itself is awesome. 

Training at Pichon’s home. A mat room is every jiujitsu practioner’s dream house. Thanks for having us on a Friday night 👍
#bjj #jiujitsu #ribeiro #deftac #mundials2014viewing #noego #noegobjj

Training at Pichon’s home. A mat room is every jiujitsu practioner’s dream house. Thanks for having us on a Friday night 👍
#bjj #jiujitsu #ribeiro #deftac #mundials2014viewing #noego #noegobjj

Andrew Laxa Interview

Andrew Laxa is a 23 year old purple belt from the Philippines, who decided to leave the comforts of home and company of family & friends, to fly in the US to fulfill his jiujitsu dreams. He knew that it wouldn’t be greener pastures and a walk in the park. It would take sacrifice and everyday struggle to achieve his goals.

I decided to interview him since he is a good inspiration to the jiujitsu community. He embodies the jiujitsu lifestyle of going outside your comfort zone, working hard and doing what you love despite the obstacles. I want to share his story to serve as an inspiration and to show that the greatest joy and glory is the one we work hardest for. He is more than just a purple belt. More than just a teammate from Deftac Pilipinas. He is also a good friend and a man in pursuit of his dreams. 

noegobjj: What made you decide to leave the Philippines and fly to the US? And why CA among other states?

Andrew Laxa: Well, its no secret that southern California is where the scene is at. In my opinion, all the good tournaments are either here or UAE. I just wanna be where the action is at, man. Learn by training with guys who live and breathe bjj man.

noegobjj: How’s life in the US compared to the Philippines? Any major adjustments?

Andrew Laxa: Life here is tough man. I need to work while still making time for bjj but it’s good, man. The training I get is well worth it. The hardest thing has been being my own man, i guess, and making things work despite the adversity. Hardest thing i had to do was walk home from work for 2 hours, man. Hahaha, that wasn’t fun.

noegobjj: What’s a normal day like for you?

Andrew Laxa: On days i can train i get up for comp class 1030 to 12 then go home rest and train again from 6 to 9. This only happens 3 days a week. 4 days of the week i work my day job. haha! (I) gotta hustle, man!

noegobjj: Let’s talk jiujitsu. How is training different in the US and in the Philippines?

Andrew Laxa: Well here i get my ass whooped all the time. haha! The level here is nuts. Guys here take bjj very seriously and it shows in their game. Biggest difference i guess is the fact that everyone here is super competitive. Because the bjj scene is so strong here everyone is working really hard to improve. People have a mentality here where If they miss a day of training here someone else is getting in more training than them. That just doesn’t sit right with people here

noegobjj: And what is it like to train with that camp?

Andrew Laxa: I currently train at AOJ (Art of Jiu Jitsu Academy) . The level is amazing and its such a trip watching Prof Rafa and Prof Guihlerme walk around and teach the classes. They are amazing instructors and the coaches at AOJ are all really amazing as well. The environment is chill but people train very hard. Its different from being at home doe. Training in deftac was amazing because everyone there is a really close brother or sister to me. I miss the li’l things like grabbing a slurpee at 711 after jits. Good times. haha!

noegobjj: What are your short and long term goals? How do you intend to achieve them?

Andrew Laxa: Well my long term goal is to mold my lifestyle around bjj. It’s what i love and it’s my passion. I wanna compete and teach till i physically can’t. I wanna make friends around the world through bjj and hopefully win a few titles on the way haha

noegobjj: Any plans of coming back to the Philippines?

Andrew Laxa: As of now maybe not. Things are up in the air for me and i don’t really wanna go back for good. I’m young and i wanna explore different possibilities. I can’t do that if i move back to the Philippines. Some unexpected opportunities have come my way and they aren’t bringing closer to home. I miss my friends and family though so i will definitely visit soon!

I wanna say thanks to all the friends and family back home, everyone who supports me no matter what. Osssss

*****

Andrew Laxa is starting in his journey to be a champion in life. The rest will follow. Wishing Andrew and those in a daily struggle all the best in life’s journey. God speed.

May we all serve as an inspiration to one another in our journey to be champions in life.

*you can follow Andrew Laxa in his blog: http://truerolls.tumblr.com/ ; instagram: laxaandrew

A beautiful film by Stuart Cooper that encompasses sentiments about jiu-jitsu. Stuart Cooper just defined jiu-jitsu through this film.